More Quilting & a bit of Me Made May

I’ve been hand quilting a waistcoat for the Weald & Downland Museum & thought you might like to see it.  Baasically, it’s a 17th century bodywarmer.  The top is a fine pale green wool, there’s carded sheeps wool in the centre and a linen backing. It’s quilted with linen thread which has to be waxed.

Quilted waistcoat

This is the waistcoat quilted & ready to be made up.

Quilting 17th century styleIt took me about 15 hours to quilt.  The thick linen backing means that it’s hard to get up any speed.

I decided to show a couple of Me Made May outfits because I particularly like them.

Me Made MayI think it might be the setting like best rather than the outfit.

This is a refashioned (altered & dyed) skirt and a top made from another skirt.

Top, no pattern requiredThis is my favourite top.  I made it from a Liberty Print skirt I found in a charity shop. Those are my me made shoes too.  I’ve worn them most days this month. The trousers are Olsen from a charity shop.

Some days I’ve only got one visible me made but I always wear my me made knickers, so that’s two. (In answer to Curtise).

I’ve got a dress in progress at the moment so I will have something new to wear this month. Hooray!

Happy Wednesday everyone!

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Refashioning a Shirt

Remember this?

Shirt - beforeIt’s a shirt I bought in a charity shop because the linen was good quality. My aim was to turn it into something I could wear day to day.

Shirt - afterFront view

Shirt - afterBack view – I particularly like the back

I hung it on a door so that I could gradually work out what to do with it. It was a bit of a puzzle.

Below are the stages I went through to do it.  Obviously, the shirt might not be to your taste but the principles apply to remaking any large boxy shirt into something wearable.

Cut off the collarCut off the collar.  I wanted the shirt to have a Nehru collar so I used the collar stand.  It would fray left like this so I needed to bind it.  I chose linen left over from making a dress.

Making bias bindingAdd bias bindingAMake and add bias binding.

Cut to lengthHem

Cut to length & hem

New buttons

Remove old & add new buttons. Make extra buttonholes. The shirt just had too few buttons to hold together properly.

Back tabBack tabShape the back with tucks & cover with a tab made from left over fabric. Add buttons.

Making tabs

Make tabs to shape the front. Tabs are at the waist for both back & front.

Cut sleeves Bind sleeves

Decide on sleeve length. Cut, finish raw edge and bind sleeve.

And that’s it!

Shirt - after

The quilt’s finished and on show

My finished quilt at the Weald and Downland Museum.

Made of wool and linen scraps and photos printed on an old cotton valence.  The borders and binding are made of wool melton – I was planning to have a jacket from that but it’s all gone now.

 

I’m going to try more photo printing on fabric – maybe in smaller projects to start with. Cushions anyone?

 

I’m linking this to Lakota’s Ta Dah Tuesday.  I love to pop over and see what everyone is up to – definitely worth a look.

Quilt Progress – Yes Really!

To be honest, I would love to do an outfit post.   Yesterday I wore lots of stuff I made myself & my lovely new boots from Green Shoes. But it’s not to be.  Sadly, I forgot to take a photo until it was too late & I was very crumpled.  Today I have been wearing jodphurs most of the day; it’s not a great look to start with and I am an especially scruffy person.

Anyway, the photos are all printed on fabric and since I took this photo I have cropped them all to the sizes I want.

I have a rough plan. I’m not promising to keep to it though – in fact, I’ve already changed a few things.

And this is the heap of linen & wool fabrics ready for ironing. I’ve now ironed them and made a few choices.

Progress indeed!

Quilt ideas – progress

This is the next stage of my new quilt.  I am looking for interesting details which might translate into textiles.  My idea is to include sewn details as well as photographs printed on to fabric.

Next step is to get out the bags of linen and wool and audition them.

A New Quilt – First Thoughts

This photograph was taken at the Weald & Downland Museum, West Sussex.

At that time I was involved in a project to make a quilt commemorating the museum’s 40th anniversary and these photographs were my starting point.  Along with several other women, I made two blocks to put in the quilt.  They were made to strict guidelines and in cotton fabric.  The resulting quilt is beautiful and well worth a look if you go to the museum.

Now I’m planning to start a quilt of my own based on this beautiful museum.  I’m thinking of wools & linens for the blocks and my starting point will be my photograph collection.

If you would like to see a trial run for this type of quilt look here.

Over the next few weeks I will show how I get from my first thoughts about a quilt to an actual quilt. I hope you’ll find it useful.

Experimental Pattern Free Skirt

This is made from a fairly heavyweight linen from one of the shops in Goldhawk Road, London.

I started with this altered skirt

I measured the length, width, waist, size of the splits and looked at how the skirt had been shaped.

I transferred the measurements to the linen fabric and cut out the two rectangles.

I sewed the rectangles together, leaving the side slits open and a space for the zip open.

I made pleats in the waist by marking them with a ruler & chalk & then sewing at the top only.

I sewed in the zip – I recycled this from an old skirt.

I covered the waist with bias binding – lovely satin stuff – leftover from a previous project.

I finished the slits and hemmed the skirt.

The top was also pattern free.  Details to follow.