Slow Processes

solar dyeing

Recently, I’ve been doing a lot of solar dyeing.  If you want to see the results, take a look at this post over on my other blog.

It’s a slow process but I’m enjoying it.

Another slow process is this:

applique

It’s a slow story but in short, I used an old,worn out but gorgeous skirt as a pattern and made a very boring denim skirt. After a few wears I added the appliques above to all eight panels.

Since then I’ve used variegated silk thread to highlight and stiffen the hem.  I’m not sure I’ve finished yet.  A few more wears and I might know.

The appliques made me think of Japanese Boro quilts and I’ve now cut up a pile of worn out jeans to make my own version.

Do you keep on “improving” your projects?  I’d love to know.

Thanks for dropping by.

 

Advertisements

Author: norma

Hello, I'm Norma and I live in Wales. I love animals, baking, growing veggies but my big loves are sewing and history.

3 thoughts on “Slow Processes”

  1. I’ve got a blouse that I’ve done two versions of. The first was a learning experience. The second is much better but I’m noticing areas where it couls still be improved. I think at a certain point it’s good to let go and just let it be what it will be. Some fabrics have peculiar characteristics and we have to accept that. We can learn and take that knowledge to the next project. I don’t know about others but if I keep on “improving” one thing over and over it becomes a combination of vanity and futility. Nobody will ever do something 100% perfect, never. But we can do good, better even excellent and grow our skills. But nothing is ever perfection. I’ve studies many books and pieces at exhibits and noticed minor irregularities, even in couture pieces. Sometimes the execution does look perfect but the overall design is a hot mess from my POV.

  2. I’ve got a blouse that I’ve done two versions of. The first was a learning experience. The second is much better but I’m noticing areas where it could still be improved. I think at a certain point it’s good to let go and just let it be what it will be. Some fabrics have peculiar characteristics and we have to accept that. We can learn and take that knowledge to the next project. I don’t know about others but if I keep on “improving” one thing over and over it becomes a combination of vanity and futility. Nobody will ever do something 100% perfect, never. But we can do good, better even excellent and grow our skills. But nothing is ever perfection. I’ve studied many books and pieces at exhibits and noticed minor irregularities, even in couture pieces. Sometimes the execution does look perfect but the overall design is a hot mess from my POV.
    Please use this comment. The previous one has typos. I’m sorry about that.

    1. Thank you for that – definitely food for thought.
      I think you are absolutely right about letting go & I have learned over the years that imperfections don’t usually get noticed.
      In this case though I think the skirt was somehow “unfinished”. I am still thinking about it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s